New Cornish Seaweed

New Cornish Seaweed

The Cornish Seaweed Company’s selected seaweeds are tested by the FSA and adhere to Natural England’s Code of Conduct to ensure that the customer and the environment are kept in top condition. Their range of dried seaweeds are available in 20, 30 and 40g bags, the range includes the following varieties of seaweed • Kombu – Commonly known as Kelp, a great one for fast, simple flavour and fantastic for creating base stocks. • Sea Spaghetti – Traditionally used by coastal communities for centuries adding nutrients, texture and a gently sweet flavour to dishes. • Dulse – Has a rich almost spicy flavour and a soft texture. • Sea Greens – The base for crispy seaweed, great raw in salads or lightly boiled or steamed. • Sea Salad – A mix of Dulse, Sea Lettuce and Nori. A great introduction to the variety and flavours of seaweed. All the bags are re-sealable and have a shelf life of 10-12 months. We will also be offering Cornish Seaweed Salt which consists of a mix of flaked Dulse, Nori, Sea Lettuce and sea salt. Seaweed Salt can be used as a healthier alternative to other salt and goes well with potatoes, eggs, fish and shellfish. Seaweeds are the most powerful food that we have on this planet. It contains all the minerals that our body needs and has the highest number of vitamins, minerals and trace elements of any other food group. Unsurprisingly, it has played a vital part in the diets of a large number of cultures, including the Inuit, Japanese, Incas and the Irish Seaweed has a low fat...
Oca Root/Tuber

Oca Root/Tuber

  You may remember the Oca leaves that we produced earlier this year, underneath those leaves were growing these remarkable tubers. It is now time for us to start harvesting our first crop of Oca Root from Canara Farm, we hope that this highly nutritious and unusual gourmet vegetable will prove a popular addition to menus through-out the South West. This brightly coloured root vegetable originates in the Andes of South America, and was introduced to Europe in 1830 as an alternative to the potato, it was introduced to New Zealand in 1860 and is sometimes called the “New Zealand yam” due to its popularity as a table vegetable. In many parts of South America it is second only to the potato in area planted. It is an excellent source of vitamin C, potassium and iron. Oca is one of the important staple crops of the Andean highlands, due to its easy propagation, and tolerance for poor soil, high altitude and harsh climates. In traditional Andean cropping systems, it is often planted after potato and therefore benefits from persisting nutrients applied to, or left over from, the potato crop. Oca tends to have a slightly tangy lemon taste. The flesh is firm but juicy and crisp when eaten raw or lightly cooked, and becoming more starchy if fully cooked. The tubers don’t require peeling when eating Oca raw – just wash them clean, and they can be sliced to add a hint of a lemony zest to salads. Alternatively cook them in the same way as potatoes – boiled, baked, grilled or fried. They also make an excellent addition...