Pineapples – A Fruit Fit for a King (or Queen)

Pineapples – A Fruit Fit for a King (or Queen)

Originally discovered and brought back to Europe by explorers in the 1400’s, pineapples were grown across South America for hundreds of years previously and were a welcomed food source for indigenous tribes. It was in South America the fruit was first referred to as Ananas, a name that, in many European languages, remains the same today. The crop is now cultivated globally, with over 25 million tonnes exported around the world from countries including Indonesia and Costa Rica, which remains the world’s largest producer of pineapples. Born out of necessity, due to increased demands from European and North American consumers, agricultural developments have allowed for flowering of the plant to be artificially induced. This makes way for a second crop of smaller fruits, maximising yield. Pineapple is one of the few fruits that do not ripen after harvest. Once the crop has been cut its colour and flavour will remain the same until it starts to perish. For this reason the crop is cut early and the rich yellow colour is artificially induced before harvest. If left to turn yellow the fruit would bruise more easily during transport, leaving it more susceptible to rotting. A Brief History of Pineapples The name pineapple was originally used to refer to what we now call pine cones. When the fruit was first discovered in South America, by European explorers, it was given the name pineapple in reference to its rough and wood like texture, similar to a pine cone. The fruit earned its scientific name ,Ananas Comosus, from the indigenous tribal languages spoken across South America and was first recorded almost 100...
Kale – A British Favourite

Kale – A British Favourite

A regular in our fridges, Kale has become the mainstay of many British menus. The term ‘Kale’ refers to a cultivar of the Brassica Oleracea Species, however it is more closely related to the wild cabbage than to other cultivated members of the brassica family, such as Calabrese, Cauliflower and Cabbages. Varieties of Kale are classified not only by the colour of their leaves, but also by their leaf shape and stem height. The most recognizable variety, Green Curly or ‘Scots Kale’ is followed closely in popularity by Black Kale (often referred to as ‘Cavelo Nero’ or ‘Tuscan Cabbage’). In 2015 supermarket giant Waitrose recorded a 343% increase on the previous year’s sales of Cavelo Nero. Comparatively, during the same time period, spinach achieved a mere 19% increase. Originating from Asia Minor; the westernmost point of Asia, now known as Turkey, Kale is thought to have been brought to Europe by Celtic wanderers in around 600 BC. In more recent years the leafy green has been championed by British farmers due to its hardy nature. The annual crop has proved resilient in winter and can survive in temperatures as low as -15 degrees Celsius. The plant is also well suited to a variety of soil compositions, but thrives in the mineral rich soil found in the east of England. Throughout the UK growing season (June to March) the majority of British kale is produced in Lincolnshire, however outside this season it is readily available from European Growers. The composition of Kale is primarily water, carbohydrates, protein and fats. The vegetable also contains, per 100g, more than four times of...
Natural Remedies – foods to cure your ailments

Natural Remedies – foods to cure your ailments

Fruits, vegetables and herbs have been used as natural remedies for as far back as records can be traced. But how many of these traditional cures actually work or have any scientific facts to back them up? Hopefully this list of produce could help ease your constipation or at least help stop your cough. Natural remedies for curing coughs. The nutrients in pineapple juice have been shown to sooth the symptoms of a cough or cold. Juice from pineapples contains bromelain, a mixture of enzymes with strong anti -inflammatory properties. It is thought that pineapple juice has mucolytic properties which aid the break up and dissolve mucus. The leaves in the peppermint plant release menthol which can help soothe the throat and act as a decongestant, which helps to break down mucus. Salt, although not as tasty as the two previous natural remedies gargling salt and water can help to soothe a scratchy throat and relieve the irritation. There are a variety of antibacterial and antimicrobial properties in honey. Honey has been shown to be an effective cough suppressant and mixing honey and lemon can ease a sore throat. Natural remedies for a cold. Vitamin C which is found in many fruits and vegetables such as oranges, kiwis and bananas, plays an important role in your body. While consumption of fruits or vegetables high in vitamin C may not cure your cold completely they will help supporting your immune system with the added vitamin The rich orange flesh of the pumpkin is full of beta carotene, which is broken down by the body to make vitamin A. Vitamin A...