Ponthier: Premium Purées

Ponthier: Premium Purées

About Ponthier Based in South West France, Ponthier have been passing on the craft of fruit growing from father to son for over 70 years. Similar to Westcountry, Ponthier was originally run as a fresh fruit wholesaler, selling produce grown on their family farm.  In 1998 the company created the first range of chilled purées and coulis, combining tradition and innovation. Ponthier now exports purees to over 65 countries globally, and its partners include Le Cordon Bleu, The Association of Pastry Chefs and The World Cocktail Championships. Experts in their field Ponthier purées, or fruit ‘pulp’, are made from fruits harvested annually by partner suppliers around the world. Harvesting the fruit once a year ensures that the origin and maturity of the fruit creates the best possible flavour. Each batch undergoes a Brix test, to analyse the sugar levels in the fruit ensuring it is ripe for harvest.  The fruit is then transported under optimal conditions to maintain its freshness. Once it reaches the Ponthier factory it is placed in their temperature controlled storage warehouse, a building large enough to store 5700 pallets of fruit (a full year’s production). The produce is sorted and crushed before pure cane sugar is added and the pulp is refined.  The mixture is then flash pasteurised and immediately cooled, ensuring it is safe and hygienic whilst preserving taste and colour. Each batch is then tasted to ensure a smooth texture, as well as a flavor and colour identical to fresh fruit. About the Products All products are chilled – No defrosting period is required and products can be refrigerated for up to 15...
UK Butter Prices Continue to Rise

UK Butter Prices Continue to Rise

Since the beginning of 2016 UK butter prices have risen over 20%. This is because the cost of cream (the primary ingredient in butter) has tripled in price. It’s no surprise that industry professionals are now warning of shortages leading up to the Christmas period. These shortages could not only affect the price of butter but may well impact the price of other dairy products, including festive favourites such as mince pies. So what exactly is driving prices up?   The UK Milk Crisis The reason we are seeing price increases on dairy products such as butter and cream, whilst the cost of milk remains relatively low, is primarily due to competition for UK milk supply which is falling rapidly. Stuck in a boom-bust cycle, the dairy market has become increasingly volatile. 2016 saw a 10% decrease in production of British milk. Farmers were advised, following a Russian ban on all EU dairy imports, that the UK market was saturated. This drove prices down and led to a surplus of milk. Now plagued by the increasing production costs and ever-growing prevalence of diseases such as Bovine Tuberculosis, producers are struggling to sustain healthy herds and turn a profit, following a poor year financially in 2016. Whilst some dairy farmers are choosing to diversify, most struggle to remain financially solvent with many forced to quit farming altogether.   Supermarket Price Wars The ongoing battle between supermarket giants has further contributed to the plummeting price of British milk. Whilst retailers battle it out for the cheapest price per litre, driven by consumer trends, farm gate prices have fallen as low as...
Vanilla: The Price of Black Gold

Vanilla: The Price of Black Gold

Madagascar is the world’s largest producer of vanilla, exporting over 80% of the global supply. Following a cyclone that devastated the area, the country’s vanilla trade remains unstable, with prices continuing to rise and supply dwindling. Cyclone Enawo hit the Island of Madagascar in March this year, devastating the local area and wiping out up to 80% of the annual yield. This followed two consecutive years of crop failure due to droughts, a consequence of El Niño weather patterns. With emergency aid the primary concern for the country, supply of vanilla has been scarce and production has been slow to restart. There has been global concern over the future supply and quality of the pods during the period of instability. The overwhelming demand for the product, which is 100% natural and appeals to current consumer trends, has seen buyers seeking to secure sufficient stock for the winter period. This additional pressure could compromise overall quality as its sees commercial producers exporting quick cured and even green vanilla pods. These supply and demand issues, coupled with unfavourable currency movements, mean that further price increases can be expected universally across all vanilla products, with vanilla pods seeing the largest increase. Littlepod vanilla paste and vanilla extract are an excellent way to continue to support the REAL vanilla campaign, as it relieves pressure on growers by making use of all pods harvested, regardless of shape or size. The products are versatile, and although prices may increase, will remain a more affordable and sustainable alternative to vanilla pods, without compromising on quality and flavour.  ...