Cornwall vs Climate

Cornwall vs Climate

Cornwall is well known for its variety of beautiful beaches and rich history; just a few features that make Cornwall a popular holiday destination and also why many consider Cornwall to be one of the best places in the UK to live. Compared to the majority of the UK, Cornwall has the sunniest climate, the south west coast in particular has the only sub-tropical climate and Cornwall experiences some of the longest hours of sunlight. These factors including the warm ocean currents ensure that the events of snow and frost are a rarity, even during the winter months. But what happens in Cornwall when the climate starts to change? Changes in the climate have implications for all elements of life. Wetter, stormier winters and hotter drier summers will not only impact the environment but also society and the economy; direct impact on water resources, infrastructure, health, tourism and agriculture to name a few. Crops benefit from the coast due to the warm air created by the sea. The conditions help minimize the risk of frost damage and aid growth for crops all year round. With over 400 miles of coastline Cornwall is considered a perfect growing location because of the optimum weather patterns the county has to offer. For a county or country, as some consider Cornwall to be, the economy is heavily dependent on agriculture and tourism. Heavy snowfall, freezing temperatures and strong winds left the entire county covered and farmers and suppliers were faced with a major challenge. Cauliflower is no doubt a favourite amongst fruit and veg with over half a million harvested each week however...