Natural Remedies – foods to cure your ailments

Natural Remedies – foods to cure your ailments

Fruits, vegetables and herbs have been used as natural remedies for as far back as records can be traced. But how many of these traditional cures actually work or have any scientific facts to back them up? Hopefully this list of produce could help ease your constipation or at least help stop your cough. Natural remedies for curing coughs. The nutrients in pineapple juice have been shown to sooth the symptoms of a cough or cold. Juice from pineapples contains bromelain, a mixture of enzymes with strong anti -inflammatory properties. It is thought that pineapple juice has mucolytic properties which aid the break up and dissolve mucus. The leaves in the peppermint plant release menthol which can help soothe the throat and act as a decongestant, which helps to break down mucus. Salt, although not as tasty as the two previous natural remedies gargling salt and water can help to soothe a scratchy throat and relieve the irritation. There are a variety of antibacterial and antimicrobial properties in honey. Honey has been shown to be an effective cough suppressant and mixing honey and lemon can ease a sore throat. Natural remedies for a cold. Vitamin C which is found in many fruits and vegetables such as oranges, kiwis and bananas, plays an important role in your body. While consumption of fruits or vegetables high in vitamin C may not cure your cold completely they will help supporting your immune system with the added vitamin The rich orange flesh of the pumpkin is full of beta carotene, which is broken down by the body to make vitamin A. Vitamin A...
Food Art – Playing with your food (creatively).

Food Art – Playing with your food (creatively).

You may have seen our social media channels this week featured some of the warehouse teams experiments with food art. Their creative efforts have inspired us to have a look at the use of food in the art world. There are many chefs who have transformed plating into astonishing food art. A few weeks ago we featured the Dutch artist Stephan Brusch, who makes amazing pop art using the humble banana. History of food art. Artists have used food as a subject through many different art movements.  The Romans and Greeks took pride in realistically depicting food in their art. In Roman paintings a glass bowl of fruit was often included to highlight the variety of produce that wealthy citizens had access to. Archaeologists have discovered images of food on the walls of the pyramids. It was believed that these drawings would nourish them in the afterlife. The renaissance period featured many paintings that incorporated still life food images. Renowned impressionist, Vincent Van Gogh produced many paintings that featured food such as Still Life: Blue Enamel Coffeepot, Earthenware and Fruit, Still Life with Apples, Pears, Lemons and Grapes and Still Life with Lemons on a Plate. French born artist Paul Cezanne adapted the still life genre mixing both traditional and modern approaches. One of the most famous uses of food in contemporary art is Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans (1962). During his life Warhol created a variety of pieces using the Campbell’s soup can as the focus.  The original exhibition featured 32 canvases (510 mm × 410 mm), each featuring one of the different flavours of Campbell’s soup that was available at the time. American...
Carrots – keep calm & carrot on.

Carrots – keep calm & carrot on.

Carrots are a domesticated form of the wild carrot, which is native to Europe and southwestern Asia. The carrots is a root vegetable, most commonly they are orange, although purple, black, white, red and yellow varieties exist. It is believed that they were originally grown in Persia for the leaves and seeds. The carrot is one of the world’s top ten most economically important vegetable crops. Worldwide production of carrots (2014) was 38.8 million tonnes. The Chinese produced 45% of this total, cultivating an astonishing 17.3 million tonnes. Countries such as Russia and the United states (both responsible for 4%) are also large scale carrot producers. A history of carrots The familiar orange carrot is derived from the wild carrot, which has white coloured roots. Ancient Greek and Roman writings refer to edible white roots which could be the carrot or possibly the parsnip. The earliest known vegetable, confirmed to be a carrot can be traced to the 10th century in Persia and Asia Minor. It is thought that carrots were originally purple or white with a thin root, at some point a mutation occurred and the purple pigment was removed which resulted in a new form of yellow carrot, from which the orange carrot was later developed. The domestication of the carrot has transformed a relatively small, thin white strong flavoured taproot into a large, orange good flavoured annual crop. Modern techniques have seen the carrot further refined, with the flavour, sweetness, texture and colour improved. Other modern breading techniques have seen a more pest and disease resistant vegetable. Types of cultivated carrots. There are two main types of...
Cherries – luxury seasonal fruit

Cherries – luxury seasonal fruit

Fantastic quality English cherries have been arriving in our fridges in recent weeks. The cherry was first grown in the UK at Teynham in Kent, by order of Henry VIII, who tasted them in Flanders. The word cherry derives from French cerise, Spanish cereza, all originating from the Latin cerasum, both refereing to an ancient Greek region near Giresun, Turkey, which is where it is believed the first cherries were exported from, to Europe. What are Cherries? Cherries, like plums are fleshy drupe or stone fruits of the genus Prunus. Many cherry varieties are members of the subgenus Cerasus, which is distinguished by having smooth fruit with a weak or no groove along one side. It is much easier to divide cherries into two types the sweet cherry and the sour cherry. The sweet cherry is usually larger than the sour variety, and are fantastic eaten fresh or when cooked. The sour cherry is rounder than the heart shaped sweet cherry. The flesh is much softer and are not suitable for eating raw. The sour cherry is normally cooked with sugar to create pies, preserves and relishes. Where do Cherries come from? In 2014 Turkey was the largest producer of sweet cherries, world production was 2.25 million tonnes for which Turkey produced 20%. Other large producers were the U.S.A and Iran. Sour cherry production in 2014 was 1.36 million tonnes, with Russia, Ukraine and Turkey being the largest producers. 2014 was a record year for British cherry production, with 3,500 tonnes produced, this was more than double the previous year. English cherries getting better every year. Traditional cherry orchards in Kent were phased out during...
Radish – the plant that built the pyramids.

Radish – the plant that built the pyramids.

The radish is a variety of herbaceous plant and member of the mustard family. The radish root is also related to kale, broccoli, cauliflower and horseradish. Radishes prefer a cooler climate and will grow quickly providing the conditions (fertile soil, sunlight and moisture) are adequate. The name radish comes from the Latin word “radix”. Traditionally radishes were eaten to stimulate the appetite and prepare the palate for the upcoming meal. Radishes were usually served with salt for dipping, sometimes with butter and brown bread. Radishes have a mild to hot peppery flavour with a crunchy texture. They can be eaten raw or pickled, boiled and even fried. Although less commonly used the fresh leaves can also be eaten. The seeds are also used as a spice. History of the Radish. Radishes were cultivated first in China. There are early records showing that radishes were enjoyed in Ancient Greece and before the construction of the Pyramids in Egypt. During the construction of the Pyramids the workers were paid in radishes. The Ancient Greeks served their radishes with vinegar and honey and made gold replicas which they offered to the god Apollo. Records show that the radish reached England during the mid 16th century.   Varieties of Radish. There are many different radish varieties, these can be split into four types, according to the season they are grown. They also grow in a range shapes, lengths and colours. Some of the varieties are listed below: White Icicle – A pungent white variety that grows between 5 and 8 inches in length. Sparkler – Bright red and round with a white tip and...