Cornwall vs Climate

Cornwall vs Climate

Cornwall is well known for its variety of beautiful beaches and rich history; just a few features that make Cornwall a popular holiday destination and also why many consider Cornwall to be one of the best places in the UK to live. Compared to the majority of the UK, Cornwall has the sunniest climate, the south west coast in particular has the only sub-tropical climate and Cornwall experiences some of the longest hours of sunlight. These factors including the warm ocean currents ensure that the events of snow and frost are a rarity, even during the winter months. But what happens in Cornwall when the climate starts to change? Changes in the climate have implications for all elements of life. Wetter, stormier winters and hotter drier summers will not only impact the environment but also society and the economy; direct impact on water resources, infrastructure, health, tourism and agriculture to name a few. Crops benefit from the coast due to the warm air created by the sea. The conditions help minimize the risk of frost damage and aid growth for crops all year round. With over 400 miles of coastline Cornwall is considered a perfect growing location because of the optimum weather patterns the county has to offer. For a county or country, as some consider Cornwall to be, the economy is heavily dependent on agriculture and tourism. Heavy snowfall, freezing temperatures and strong winds left the entire county covered and farmers and suppliers were faced with a major challenge. Cauliflower is no doubt a favourite amongst fruit and veg with over half a million harvested each week however...
Curds and Croust – Cornish Cheese

Curds and Croust – Cornish Cheese

We are very excited to be adding another fantastic Cornish product to our range, Curds and Croust are a delightful selection of local cheeses. Based in Redruth the team behind Curds and Croust led by master cheese maker Martin Gaylard, make an artisan range of hand crafted soft cheeses. Each of their four cheeses is made using Cornish milk, that is sourced within 30 miles of the dairy. This delightful range will work wonderfully as part of a Cornish cheese board and would compliment many of the artisan products in our Plough to Plate range. All of these cheeses are available in rounds of 1kg and 165g, making them perfect for retail and food service. The Curds and Croust Cornish cheese range. Miss Wenna – a Cornish brie. Made using Cornish milk to produce a creamy brie. This cheese is smooth and mellow, with a wafer thin rind and a subtle aroma. Boy Laity – a Cornish Camembert. A traditional mould ripened Camembert that is rich, bold and buttery in texture. The Truffler – a Cornish truffle brie. A delightful combination of creamy Cornish brie and the earthy characteristics of truffles. Russet Squire – Cider washed cheese.  This cheese is bathed in Cornish cider to give the rind an unique russet look to the rind, making it possibly the most decadent cheese in the range. (Coming soon). Curds and Croust? When making cheese the milk is separated into solids known as curds and liquid called whey. Curds are white, and have a slippery gelatinous feel. In the early stages of cheese making they are very acidic and it is during the lactic fermentation...
Chard, healthy, seasonal produce.

Chard, healthy, seasonal produce.

Chard is a leafy vegetable, it is a member of the beet family. Unlike beetroot which are primarily harvested for their roots, chard is grown for it’s crunchy stalks and larger tender leaves. For many thousands of years chard has been cultivated, it most likely originates in the Mediterranean, where it was incredibly popular until the introduction of spinach. There are many different varieties of chard, this delightful vegetable is known by many names including Swiss chard, sea kale beet, white beet, Sicilian beet, Roman kale, spinach beet, perpetual spinach, mangold, bright lights, crab beet, strawberry kale and silver beet. The name chard originates from the French word “carde”, which refers to the artichoke thistle or cardoon. It is possible to eat chard raw or cooked. When the leaves are tender and young they are commonly used in salads. As it matures it can be sautéed or added to recipes, the leaves and stems become tougher and the taste is more bitter, the cooking process helps to mellow the flavour. Swiss Chard. This variety is also known as silver beet and perpetual spinach. The leaves are shiny, ribbed and  tender with a deep green colour and white stalks. Taste wise this variety is very similar to spinach, although it has a more bitter flavour. The ribbed leaves can often become quite muddy, so it is important to wash any dirt off before use. After washing it is best kept wrapped in a paper towel and refrigerated, under these conditions it should keep for up to four days. The name may mislead some into thinking that it originates in Switzerland. The word Swiss was...
Purple Sprouting Broccoli – Seasonal Eating

Purple Sprouting Broccoli – Seasonal Eating

Purple sprouting has been cultivated since Roman times. It is only during the last 30 years that it has come to prominence in the U.K. As the name suggests purple sprouting gets it’s name from the purple colour of the head of the plant. Part of the reason that purple sprouting has become popular is due to the mild flavour. This tasty flavour compliments a variety of dishes and works well with salads, quiches, pasta bakes stir fries and any dish that you would use broccoli in. Purple sprouting works well with salty ingredients, it pairs well with bacon, anchovies, parmesan and blue cheese. To achieve a sweeter and richer flavour it is often roasted, the flavour can also be enhanced with chilli and garlic. Purple sprouting’s bittersweet notes work well with game or red meat. Broccoli or calabrese? Like turnips and swedes, many people are confused by the difference between broccoli and calabrese. Where as turnips and swede are completely different, calabrese and broccoli are two varieties of the same vegetable. These different varieties have distinct characteristics which allow you to easily distinguish one from the other. Physically calabrese and broccoli look very different from each other. The head of calabrese is green, broccoli produces white or purple heads (referred to as white sprouting and purple sprouting). Calabrese has a mild flavour and a tender texture that is close to asparagus. Broccoli has a mildly bitter taste and is tougher than calabrese. Most of the plant is edible head,stalks and leaves. They are at their tastiest when they’re young. When buying purple sprouting look for the stalks to...
Turnips and Swede – What is the difference?

Turnips and Swede – What is the difference?

Turnips Turnips are a cruciferous vegetable (member of the mustard family). Turnips thrive in cool climates. The turnip that we know is thought to have descended from the Wild Turnip which is native to Central Asia, the Mediterranean and the Near East. Turnips have been sold in England since the 16th century. The turnip was a staple with the Romans and across Europe before the potato. Turnips were used for both human and animal feed. When the first fleet went from England to Australia in 1787 turnips were planted on Norfolk Island in 1788. There are more than 30 varieties of turnip, the most familiar being the European type. This is a creamy/white globe with a purple top. The purple top comes from top of the vegetable being out of the soil and exposed to the sun. The taste of the turnip is sweet and slightly peppery. Perhaps due to it’s association with livestock fodder the turnip is not as popular in the U.K as it is in other parts of the world. The French serve them glazed, braised or sautéd, Italians put them in risottos. The Chinese sweet roast them whereas in they are enjoyed pickled in Japan and the Middle East. Turnip Records Scott and Mardie Robb grew the heaviest turnip on record, weighing 17.7 kg at the Alaska State Fair, Palmer, USA on 1.9.04. China produces the most turnips in the world a whooping 15,899,078 tonnes per year. This is over 10000000 tonnes more than the next five biggest producers (USA, Russia, Uzbekistan, Poland and the United Kingdom). Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United...
Cauliflower – healthy, seasonal produce

Cauliflower – healthy, seasonal produce

Cauliflower, one of the most recognisable Cornish grown vegetables in our fridges, but how much do we know about the humble cauli? The cauliflower is a member of the brassica family like cabbage, kale and broccoli. The plant itself is a mass of compact flower heads that grow from the central stem to form the round head. The cauliflower is thought to be a have its origins in the North Eastern portion of the Mediterranean, particularly Turkey.  In the UK farmers have been growing caulis since the 17th century. Cauliflower cheese was first mentioned in Mrs Beeton’s 1861 book of Household Management. The cauliflower has also been an important part of Cornish farming; in 1837 the first profitable export of cauliflowers (referred to as broccoli) was taken from Hayle to Bristol. The consignment was taken up the Bristol Channel by a passenger ship called the Herald. This marked the beginnings of many exports including potatoes, strawberries and mackerel. Exports improved dramatically with the completion of the bridge across the Tamar which allowed transport from Penzance to Plymouth. Cauliflower Health Benefits. The cauliflower is quite a remarkable plant, and is packed full of vitamins and minerals including: Vitamin C Folate. Vitamin K (phylloquinone). Vitamin B-6. Vitamin B1 (thiamine). B2 (riboflavin). B3 (niacin). E (alpha-tocopherol). Calcium. Magnesium. Phosphorous. Potassium. Studies have also shown that cauliflower can have the following health benefits: Cardiovascular Health: Due to the presence of Vitamin K & Omega-3 reducing risks of conditions such as atherosclerosis. Stomach Disorders: As an excellent source of dietary fibre aiding digestion and elimination of toxins. Immune System: It is rich in antioxidants and immune-strengthening nutrients....