Meet the Producer 2019

Join Us   Plough to Plate are delighted to invite you to our 3rd Bi-annual ‘Meet the Producer’ event.     Talk to over 40 fabulous local producers and taste your way through a wide range of produce from bread and charcuterie to chocolate and wine with the obligatory pasty and cake in the middle.   Meet the team behind Plough to Plate and the Super Stars who make it all possible. Save £50   Customers placing an order over the value of £200 at either event will receive a £50 credit on their next order over £200   Join us in Cornwall                    Join us in Devon   Pavilion Centre – Cornwall Tuesday 12th February 2019   Royal Cornwall Showground, Pavilion Centre, Wadebridge, PL27 7JE.    10.00am – 4.00pm                                                                        Flybe Training Academy – Devon Wednesday 13th February 2019   Exeter Airport, Flybe Training Academy, EX5 2LJ.    10.00am – 4.00pm                                                                        We look forward to seeing you there.       www.westcountry.co.uk   |   sales@westcountry.co.uk Falmouth: 01326 372 304    |    St Austell: 01726 817 666    |   Newton Abbot: 01626 830 881      ...
Tregothnan – Britain’s first home grown tea

Tregothnan – Britain’s first home grown tea

  Tregothnan is Europe’s largest commercial producer of world class tea offering a wonderful selection of estate teas and herbal infusions in a variety of servings to suit all. Join us as we explore Tregothnan and their fantastic range available from Plough to Plate.   Tregothnan History Tregothnan is home to the Boscawen family with a rich history dating back to 1334. The Boscawen family are the largest land owners in Cornwall with 25 thousand acres. Lord Falmouth passed over the estate to his son Evelyn Boscawen 20 years ago after the passing of his wife. He decided the garden needed some energy and vision to move forward and the honourable Evelyn Boscawen brought Tregothnan to where they are today. Jonathon Jones, now managing director, joined Tregothnan in 1996 as head gardener and spent time travelling to tea plantations around the world. One of those plantations resides in the Himalayas, the world’s tallest mountain range and an important tea growing region. On his return Jonathon realised that the estate could sustain Magnolias and Rhododendron, native to the Himalayas, so why shouldn’t they be able to grow tea. It was at this moment that tea at Tregothnan was first established and in 2005 Britain’s first home-grown tea became available.   Botanical Gardens The Botanical gardens at Tregothnan are an official safe site for the keeping of rare or endangered trees and plants from all over the world. Some examples include Magnolia Rostrata, Rhododendron, a variety of Camellias and a Wollemi Pine Tree. The Wollemi Pine Tree at Tregothnan is a cutting from the original in the Blue Mountains national park in...
Good Game – Artisan Charcuterie

Good Game – Artisan Charcuterie

Good Game is an exciting new range of artisan charcuterie from Devon. They use only locally sourced ingredients and traditional curing methods. Winners of multiple Taste of the West and Food & Drink Devon awards, their mission is to make the best tasting game and cured meat in the world. Good Game support local producers, sourcing only the finest British game. Pork is produced no more than 5 miles from their base in Topsham and venison is 100% wild, from Devon and Cornwall. All of their meat is cured by hand using traditional drying methods, rather than commercial drying chambers. No nitrates or saltpetre are added during the curing process, just a little bit of salt and natural Exe & Clyde Valley air. One of their most popular products available is the Venison & Pork Burgers. These burgers are full of flavour, preservative and additive free, gluten free and frozen on day of making for maximum freshness. Contact us today for a full list of Good Game produce available, including their signature sausage, the Venison Salami.  ...
Global Harvest Set Fruit Conserves

Global Harvest Set Fruit Conserves

How It All Started Having had a successful career as a fine food buyer, David Mason founded Global Harvest in 2009, and began producing the artisan products by hand from his own kitchen. Inspired by his fondness for Membrillo, a traditional Spanish paste used to accompany cheeses, David began sourcing the finest ingredients and developing his recipes to produce a more refined texture and intense flavour.   What is Membrillo? Membrillo, or Dulce de Membrillo as it’s referred to in many South American countries, is a recipe of ancient origin and can be date back as early as the 4th century. The original recipe comprises of quince fruits stewed with honey for long periods of time. This preserves the fruit and sets the mixture. In more modern times, Membrillo can be found in kitchens across a variety of cultures, in one form or another. The majority of recipes tend not to differ too far from the original preserving method. In Argentina and Uruguay, the paste is well-set and served with soft cheese to make a popular dessert. In the Philippines, a former Spanish colony, Membrilyo is made from guava rather than quince, and makes up part of the traditional Christmas Eve fare. Closer to home, in the French region of Provence, quince cheese or pate de coing is part of the thirteen desserts, also traditionally served to celebrate Christmas. Hungarians enjoy a quince cheese called Birsalmasajt, which is prepared with cloves, cinnamon and lemon zest, and often contains a peeled walnut set within the mixture.   Why Global Harvest? The primary difference between Global Harvest products and their traditional...
Vanilla: The Price of Black Gold

Vanilla: The Price of Black Gold

Madagascar is the world’s largest producer of vanilla, exporting over 80% of the global supply. Following a cyclone that devastated the area, the country’s vanilla trade remains unstable, with prices continuing to rise and supply dwindling. Cyclone Enawo hit the Island of Madagascar in March this year, devastating the local area and wiping out up to 80% of the annual yield. This followed two consecutive years of crop failure due to droughts, a consequence of El Niño weather patterns. With emergency aid the primary concern for the country, supply of vanilla has been scarce and production has been slow to restart. There has been global concern over the future supply and quality of the pods during the period of instability. The overwhelming demand for the product, which is 100% natural and appeals to current consumer trends, has seen buyers seeking to secure sufficient stock for the winter period. This additional pressure could compromise overall quality as its sees commercial producers exporting quick cured and even green vanilla pods. These supply and demand issues, coupled with unfavourable currency movements, mean that further price increases can be expected universally across all vanilla products, with vanilla pods seeing the largest increase. Littlepod vanilla paste and vanilla extract are an excellent way to continue to support the REAL vanilla campaign, as it relieves pressure on growers by making use of all pods harvested, regardless of shape or size. The products are versatile, and although prices may increase, will remain a more affordable and sustainable alternative to vanilla pods, without compromising on quality and flavour.  ...
Mustard, one of the oldest, most popular condiments.

Mustard, one of the oldest, most popular condiments.

Mustard is one of the world’s oldest condiments. In the late 4th to early 5th century, the Romans were combining a mixture of ground mustard, pepper, caraway, lovage, grilled coriander seeds, dill, celery, thyme, oregano, onion, honey, vinegar, fish sauce, and oil, to be used as a glaze for wild boar. The Romans then took mustard seeds to Gaul, it was planted alongside grapes in vineyards. French monasteries helped to popularise the condiment and sold it during the 9th century. Maurice Grey and Antoine Poupon introduced the world to Grey Poupon Dijon mustard during the 1770s. Jeremiah Colman (founder of Colman’s Mustard) was appointed mustard maker to Queen Victoria in 1886. Mustard Plant. Although it is the seeds which are used to make mustard the leaves of the plant are also edible. The mustard plant is a member of the brassica family like broccoli and cauliflower. Many Asian leaves such as mizuna and tatsoi are technically mustards. Mustard Varieties. There are many types of mustards these include: English Mustard: One of the most familiar sites in kitchens and on dining tables throughout the U.K, this variety is made using wheat flour and turmeric. It has a hot peppery taste and the distinct yellow colour comes from the turmeric. Dijon Mustard: Is smooth and made from brown seeds, it is made using verjuice instead of vinegar. The acidity from the verjuice gives Dijon an intensified heat and a more pungent flavour. Wholegrain Mustard: It’s thick, coarse texture is made by grinding the seeds to form a paste, but not so fine that all the seeds are broken down. There are many other varieties each with a distinct...